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Title: Initiative Psychic Energy
       Being the Sixth of a Series of Twelve Volumes on the
              Applications of Psychology to the Problems of Personal and
              Business Efficiency

Author: Warren Hilton

Release Date: December 17, 2005 [EBook #17334]

Language: English


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Applied Psychology INITIATIVE
PSYCHIC ENERGY Being the Sixth of a Series of
Twelve Volumes on the Applications
of Psychology to the Problems of
Personal and Business
Efficiency     BY WARREN HILTON, A.B., L.L.B. FOUNDER OF THE SOCIETY OF APPLIED PSYCHOLOGY       ISSUED UNDER THE AUSPICES OF THE LITERARY DIGEST FOR The Society of Applied Psychology
NEW YORK AND LONDON
1920

 

 

COPYRIGHT 1914
BY THE APPLIED PSYCHOLOGY PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO

 

 

 

    CONTENTS

 

  Chapter Page       I. MENTAL SECOND WIND   STICKING TO THE JOB 3   THE LAGGING BRAIN 4   RESERVE SUPPLIES OF POWER 5   "BLUE" MONDAYS 6   HOW TO STRIKE ONE'S STRIDE 7   THE SPUR OF DESIRE 8   HOW TO RELEASE STORED-UP ENERGIES 9   THE LAWYER WHO "OVERWORKS" 10   EXCITEMENT AND THE HERO 12   ENDURING POWER OF MIND 15 II. RESERVES OF POWER   MAN'S POTENTIAL AND KINETIC ENERGIES 19   HOLDING THE TOP PACE 20   GENIUS AND THE MASTER MAN 21   MENTAL EFFECTS OF CITY LIFE 22   NEW-FOUND ENERGIES EXPLAINED 24   QUICKENED MENTALITY 25   FAST LIVING AND LONG LIVING 26   PROFESSOR PATRICK'S EXPERIMENTS 27   RATIO BETWEEN REPAIR AND DEMAND 28   PYGMIES AND GIANTS 29   TRANSFORMING INERTNESS INTO ALERTNESS 30   HOW THE MIND ACCUMULATES ENERGY 31   THE THRESHOLD OF INHIBITION 32   HIDDEN STRENGTH 33   GIVING A MAN SCOPE 34 III. THE INITIATIVE ENERGY OF SUCCESS   SOURCES OF PERSISTENCE 39   IMPORTANCE OF THE MENTAL SETTING 41   IDEAS ALL MEN RESPOND TO 42   HOW TO EXALT THE PERSONALITY 43   "GOOD STARTERS" AND "STRONG FINISHERS" 44   STEPS IN SELF-DEVELOPMENT 45   SAVING A THOUSAND A YEAR 46   LOOKING FOR A "SOFT SNAP" 47   DRAWING POWER FROM ON HIGH 48   THE MAN WHO LASTS 50 IV. HOW TO AVOID WASTES THAT DRAIN THE ENERGY OF SUCCESS   SPEEDING THE BULLET WITHOUT AIMING 53   WHY MOST MEN FAIL 54   THE SUCCESSFUL PROMOTER 56   THE HUMAN DYNAMO 57   COOL BRAINS AND HOT BOXES 58   MARVELOUS INCREASED EFFICIENCY HANDLING "PIG" 59   "OVERLOADED" HUMAN ENGINES 60   SCIENTIFIC MANAGEMENT OF SELF 61   PHYSIOLOGICAL CAUSES OF WASTE 62   TESTS FOR SENSORY DEFECTS 63   MENTAL FRICTION AND INNER WHIRLWINDS 65   PROMINENT TRAITS OF GREAT ACHIEVERS 67   WHY A MAN BREAKS DOWN 70   HOW TO ECONOMIZE EFFORT 71   HOW YOUR MENTAL CAPITAL IS DISSIPATED 72   CONQUERING INDECISION 73   WHY "CHRISTIAN SCIENCE" WORKS 74   HOW TO RELEASE PENT-UP POWER 75   PROPER RATIO BETWEEN WORK AND REST 77   DETERMINING YOUR NORM OF EFFICIENCY 79 V. THE SECRET OF MENTAL EFFICIENCY   WHERE ENERGY IS STORED 83   BODILY EFFECTS OF IDEAS 84   IMPULSES AND INHIBITIONS 85   TRAINING FOR MENTAL "TEAM-WORK" 87   RUST AND THE "DAILY GRIND" 88   IDEAS THAT HARMONIZE 89   FIVE RULES FOR CONSERVING ENERGY 90   BUSINESS LUCK AND "BLUE-SKY" THEORIES 94   DEVICES FOR COMMERCIAL EFFICIENCY 95

 

 

 

Chapter I MENTAL SECOND WIND
Sticking to the Job

Are you an unusually persevering and persistent person? Or, like most of us, do you sometimes find it difficult to stick to the job until it is done? What is your usual experience in this respect?

Is it not this, that you work steadily along until of a sudden you become conscious of a feeling of weariness, crying "Enough!" for the time being, and that you then yield to the impulse to stop?

The Lagging Brain

Assuming that this is what generally happens, does this feeling of fatigue, this impulse to rest, mean that your mental energy is exhausted?

Suppose that by a determined effort of the will you force your lagging brain to take up the thread of work. There will invariably come a new supply of energy, a "second wind," enabling you to forge ahead with a freshness and vigor that is surprising after the previous lassitude.

Nor is this all. The same process may be repeated a second time and a third time, each new effort of the will being followed by a renewal of energy.

Reserve Supplies of Power

Many a man will tell you that he does his best work in the wee watches of the morning, after tedious hours of persevering but fruitless effort. Instead of being exhausted by its long hours of persistent endeavor, the mind seems now to rise to the acme of its power, to achieve its supreme accomplishments. Difficulties melt into thin air, profound problems find easy solution. Flights of genius manifest themselves. Yet long before midnight such a one had perhaps felt himself yield to fatigue and had tied a wet towel around his head or had taken stimulants to keep himself awake.

The existence of this reserve supply of energy is manifested in physical as well as mental effort.

Men who work with their heads and men who work with their hands, scholars and Marathon runners, must alike testify to the existence of reserve supplies of power not ordinarily drawn upon.

"Blue" Mondays

If we do not always or habitually utilize this reserve power, it is simply because we have accustomed ourselves to yield at once to the first strong feeling of fatigue.

Evidence of this same fact appears in our feelings on different days. How often does a man get up from his breakfast-table after a long night's rest, when he should be feeling fresh and invigorated, and say to himself, "I don't feel like working today." And it may take him until afternoon to get into his workaday stride, if, indeed, he reaches it at all.

How to Strike One's Stride

You cannot yourself be immune from the feeling on certain days that you are not at your best. Somehow or other, your wits seem befogged. You hesitate to undertake important interviews. Your interest lags. And though crises arise in your business, you feel weighted down and unable to meet them with that shrewd discernment and decisiveness of action of which you know yourself capable.

But you realize, in your inmost self, that if you continue to exert the will and persistently hold yourself to the business in hand, sooner or later you will warm to the work, enthusiasm will come, the clouds will be dispelled, the husks will fly. Yet you have had no rest; on the contrary, you have, by continued conscious effort, consumed more and more of your vital energy.

The Spur of Desire

Obviously it was not rest that you needed.

What you required was the impulse of some strong desire that should carry you over the threshold of that first inertia into the wide field of reserve energy so rarely called upon and so rich in power.

Under the lashings of necessity, or the spur of love or ambition, men accomplish feats of mental and physical endurance of which they would have supposed themselves incapable. Here is what a certain lawyer says of his early struggles:

How to Release Stored-Up Energies

"When I was twenty-three years old, married, and with a family to support, I entered the law course of a great university. Of the many students in my class, seven, including me, were making a living while studying law.

"By special arrangement, I was relieved from attendance at lectures and simply required to pass examinations on the various subjects, and was thus enabled to retain my place as principal of a large public school. During the third and last year of my law course, I was principal of a public day school of two thousand children and an alternate night school with an enrolment of seven hundred and fifty, and I worked at the law three nights in the week and all day Sunday.

The Lawyer Who "Overworks"

"After eight months of this, the final examinations came around. They consumed a full weekโ€”from nine in the morning until five or six at night. I had no opportunity for review, so I rented a room near the law school to save the time going and coming and reviewed each night the subjects of examination for the following day.

"I did not sleep more than two hours any night in that week. On Thursday, while bolting a bit of luncheon, a fishbone stuck in my throat. Fearful of losing the result of my year's effort, I returned to my work, suffering much pain, and kept at it until Saturday night, when the examinations were concluded. The next day the surgeon who removed the fishbone said there was no reason why I should not have had 'a bad case of gangrene.'

"When I look back on that year's work I don't see how I stood it. I don't see how I kept myself at it, day in, day out, month after month without rest, recreation or relief. I am sure I could never go through it again, even if I had the courage to undertake it.

"I ranked second in a class of one hundred and eighty in my law examinations, won the second prize for the best graduating thesis, received a complimentary vote for class oratorship, and much to my surprise was soon after offered an assistant superintendency of the public schools by the school board, who knew nothing of my studies and thought my work as a teacher worthy of promotion.

"It was not only the hardest year's work but the best year's work I ever did. It exemplifies my invariable experience that the more we want to do the more we can do and the better we can do it."

Excitement and the Hero

The following is an extract from a letter quoted by Professor James as written by Colonel Baird-Smith after the siege of Delhi in 1857, to the success of which he largely contributed:

"My poor wife had some reason to think that war and disease, between them, had left very little of a husband to take under nursing when she got him again. An attack of scurvy had filled my mouth with sores, shaken every joint in my body and covered me all over with scars and livid spots, so that I was unlovely to look upon. A smart knock on the ankle joint from the splinter of a shell that burst in my face, in itself a mere bagatelle

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